Time Passages Genealogy • Dakota Land Patent Records Research

Time Passages Genealogy - We research the original Land Patent Records of your ancestors in North Dakota and South Dakota, and provide you with photocopies of the records we find - (701) 588-4541   (701) 588-4541     |    Time Passages Genealogy - We research the original Land Patent Records of your ancestors in North Dakota and South Dakota, and provide you with photocopies of the records we find - (701) 588-4541  Contact Us    |    Time Passages Genealogy - We research the original Land Patent Records of your ancestors in North Dakota and South Dakota, and provide you with photocopies of the records we find - (701) 588-4541    |

Land Entry Case Files

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The official records of the United States government in which federal land was transferred to individuals, either by sale or by grant, were called land entry papers, and the document of deed from the United States government that guaranteed title to such land was called a patent.

An applicant for a federal land patent was called an entryman, and the completed United States government file containing the actual original documents of this land transfer process is called the Land Entry Case File.

What’s in a Land Entry Case File?

  • The claimant’s land patent application showing the name of the entryman, place of residence at the time of application, description of the land, and the number of acres of land contained in the patent
  • Receipts for the payment of application fees
  • Certified copy of declaration of intent to become a citizen of the United States, if applicant was foreign-born
  • The filing of naturalization “first papers”—declaration of intent to become a citizen of the United States—was required by the United States government of foreign-born persons who desired to acquire and own free land in the United States
  • Certificate of notice of intention to file a land patent claim. (Federal regulations required claimants to file public notice of intention to prove a land patent claim, and such notice was usually published three times in the local newspaper)
  • Final proof certificate authorizing the issuance of the patent (first title deed) transferring the land from the United States government to the private individual

The final proof certificate gives the claimant’s name, age, post office address, citizenship, dates the establishment of residence, gives the number and relationship of family members, and describes the location of the tract of land with a description of the house, furniture, the type of crops planted, the number of acres under cultivation, lists farm machinery and tools, includes the testimony of the claimant and two witnesses, usually nearby neighbors, and records the patent number and date the patent was issued.

The Pre-emption Act of 1841

Some early settlers in the public domain exercised the right of pre-emption, by which they “squatted” or resided illegally on public lands without permission, built a house and made other improvements, and were later allowed to purchase the land at a minimum price of $1.25 per acre when the surrounding land was put up for public sale.

The Homestead Act of 1862

Authority Code: 251101, May 20, 1862, Homestead Entry (12 Stat. 392) offered 160 acres of land (80 acres within the railroad grant areas) free to any head of family or any person over 21 years of age who was a citizen of the United States, or any foreign-born person who had filed a declaration of intent to become a citizen of the United States, in exchange for simply residing on the land for five years and improving it. Quarter sections of land were distributed free, provided the property was lived on and improved for five years.

Cash-Sale Entry Patents

Authority Code: 272002, April 24, 1820, Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566) allowed direct cash sales of land from GLO to the public for the first time. This was an option for people to purchase the land after six months of residency for $1.25 per acre. Entrymen who applied for land patents, and who desired to obtain possession of their land prior to the five-year passage of time required by law to qualify for a homestead patent, were able to purchase their land for cash at the established price of $1.25 per acre, instead of waiting the full five years to fulfill the homestead conditions.

What if you’re not sure if your ancestor was granted a federal land patent in North Dakota or South Dakota?

In that case, filling out a Land Patent Research Request would be the logical first step.

We will research the federal land patent records of the entire state of North Dakota or South Dakota to determine if your ancestor’s name is listed in any of the land patents on file.

Our research fee is $15 for this service.

» Click Here « to Research North Dakota Land Patent Records

» Click Here « to Research South Dakota Land Patent Records


North Dakota and South Dakota
County and Township Historical Atlases
Land Ownership Maps

If your ancestors owned a farm in North Dakota or South Dakota, here’s a suggestion. Research the county and township historical atlas where your ancestors lived. This is the type of land ownership map that shows your ancestors’ farm property in the county where they resided. You may very well find your ancestors’ land, and the land of nearby family members and neighbors.

Historic Map Works, LLC, based in Portland, Maine, is an Internet company. This company has assembled a very useful database of historic digital maps of North America and the world. Family history researchers can view this collection of American property atlases. We think this may be one of the best online map and atlas destinations for family history researchers.

In case you’re wondering, Time Passages has no relationship with Historic Map Works, LLC.

Try these links. You may find a North Dakota or South Dakota County and Township Historical Atlas related to your ancestors.

The Land Ownership Maps you find here may provide you with new information about your ancestors’ land.

• ND County and Township Historical Atlases / Land Ownership Maps
North Dakota. » Click Here «

• SD County and Township Historical Atlases / Land Ownership Maps
South Dakota. » Click Here «